Leave No One Behind…

WDSD 2019

Today, Thursday 21st March 2019, marks #WorldDownSyndromeDay, which aims to bring awareness to people about #DownSyndrome. By the way, did you know that #WDSD was chosen to be on the 21st day of the 3rd month to signify the tripling of the 21st chromosome that causes Down Syndrome? Clever, right?

Last year, I talked about my thoughts on labelling people, and how people with Down Syndrome should not be called ‘special’. The world calls people with Down Syndrome, autism, or other syndromes ‘SPECIAL’ and they are said to have ‘SPECIAL NEEDS’. They think sugar-coating ‘disabled’ will lighten the effect, but from my humble point of view, it only hurts even more. For a start, being labelled differently means that they will only be separated from the crowd. It makes them feel alone and puts them on a different path from us in life.

This year, the theme is #LeaveNoOneBehind. This is a call to action to people with Down Syndrome, and I am writing on behalf of all those with Down Syndrome. I strongly agree with this ideology, as I believe that we are no different from them. They are equal, and they deserve all the opportunities that we get! Just because they have Down Syndrome does not mean that they should be denied the right to have the same opportunities as us.

People need to stop having negative attitudes and discriminating others with any kind of disability, and we can’t underestimate them either, because they have the ability to do great things too, but only if they are given a chance. And I think that we all should join together and leave no one behind, so that TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THE WORLD!

Written by,

Omar Mukhtar a.k.a. The Pawsome Lion

#The12YearOldAuthor

#BornToWrite

#GeniusFreeZone

p/s: Like, comment and share this post to show your love for our friends who are rocking those extra chromosomes!

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You’re Not ‘Special’, But You Can Change The World!

 

 

WDSD QuoteEvery 21st March marks World Down Syndrome Day, bringing awareness to everyone about people with Down Syndrome, or ‘SPECIAL’ people with ‘SPECIAL NEEDS’. Special? Where’d that come from? Yes, they may be different, but they still live among us in the same way that we do; they eat, sleep, breathe, walk, talk – just like us! Yet they are still being labelled differently from us. I personally disagree with labelling them special.

The world calls people with Down Syndrome, autism, or other syndromes ‘SPECIAL’ and they are said to have ‘SPECIAL NEEDS’. They think sugar-coating ‘disabled’ will lighten the effect, but from my humble point of view, it only hurts even more. For a start, being labelled differently means that they will only be separated from the crowd. It makes them feel alone and puts them on a different path from us in life. Do you realise that we are pushing them even further away from us? Since ‘special needs’ is just a polite term for something else, it may come across as sarcastic to people with Down Syndrome too! It also makes them feel more dependent because if they have ‘special NEEDS’, they would have to be treated specially by a specialist.

Why is this happening? They are just normal people! Sure, they may be different in how they act or look, but aren’t we all different? God made us in all different forms, shapes, sizes and colours, and while this is important to keep in mind, it is also important to remember that we are all from one human race! So even though you think you are ‘softening the blow’ by using a positive word like ‘special’, it only makes them feel different in a negative way! Try putting yourselves in their shoes! I know I wouldn’t want to be labelled ‘special’ the way they are! They want people to recognise their differences and understand their feelings, which I am sure is also true with the rest of us!

So what do we call them then? Why not try calling them by the name their parents gave them if you know them well, or if you don’t, respect the fact that they are humans as well, then recognise that they have Down Syndrome, autism or anything of the sort.

Let’s not label them ‘special’, but recognise their illness! This way, we can study them, recognise their needs, identify the assistance they require – and help them break through. Instead of putting all the responsibility on the parents, we should take it upon ourselves to play a role in helping them. Whether you’re a friend, neighbour, or simply a member of the community, you should help them every chance you get! Rather than making them fit into our world, why not we try to fit into their world? If we can understand them, this will help them to live among us and make it easier for all of us! Be it at school, in a workplace, or in public places, this awareness will help us blend into their world!

We also need to be aware that people with Down Syndrome are with us every day, therefore, we need to know of the vital importance of WDSD! This knowledge is key in understanding the diverse people of today’s world. So, please, oh please, keep in mind before you call somebody with Down Syndrome ‘special’, just think – maybe they aren’t so dependent! Maybe they could go on to do great things in the future! Maybe they could CHANGE THE WORLD!

“I see people with Down Syndrome more superior than me – after all, they do have extra chromosomes!”

– O. Mukhtar O. Mukhlis

21/03/2018

p/s: I’m an 11-year-old writer, and this is my humble point of view.